Tag Archives: Book Reviews.

Rebel Without A Bra.

Women Rule, But Has Anyone Told The Men?

Mex is heading for the Edinburgh Festival in search of Legless. Hot on her heels is Beryl a leader who has already dropped Mex in it once and now plans to do so again. Beryl must make contact with Mex before Mex finds Legless; retrieve the spark plug but not Legless, find a way back to Planet Hy Man, without Legless and save her planet. And all before the Edinburgh Festival finishes!

A feat made near impossible when considering her arch-rival Hilda, a woman as ruthless as a politician (and with the same dress sense) has access to every high- tech spying equipment going.

A Rebel Without a Bra is the second in the Planet Hy Man series where every hero is a woman old enough to know better and old enough not to care.

 

I chose to read this book, because I was reading four books at one time, all of which were a bit too serious. I thought picking this would make reading a little simpler. Who would have thought, that I wouldn’t put it down?

 

The book is well-written, well-edited, and thought through. However, there is this one thing that kept bugging me, or to say driving me away. This belongs to the category of fiction and fiction takes a lot, I mean ‘A LOT’ to be believed in. For me, it just lacked that. I mean I was intrigued, absolutely, and yet I knew I was reading something and not living it. I know that this is possible, for me at least, but since this book didn’t take me there, I felt a little disappointed.

 

But Kerrie Noor has done a fair job of executing her thoughts, and bringing humor in. Only I felt like I wanted a little more.

 

PS: This book was a giveaway from BookHub.

book-hub-circles-blue_0.png

Advertisements

A Thousand Splendid Suns.

A Thousand Splendid Suns by khaled Hosseini is about a 15 year old Miriam, married and sent to Kabul without her will. Her entire life is a struggle against patriarchy, starvation, violence and brutality and a fear that lurks constantly over her.

 

While the plot sounds truly traumatic the heroism that is portrayed despite the hindrances is startling. In spite of being subjected to so much torture and hopelessness, Mariam is defiant and doesn’t give up till the end.

 

The first time I read this, I cried the entire night. The book had just come out and I was only a part time reader, the one who picks up a book when someone would recommend me, or when I’d really be bored, or when I’d come across a book and I’d really be interested in the plot. My teacher recommended me this. She had seen me reading now and again, trying to divert myself from every other stuff going on in my life. She saw me reading and she gave me this and one other collection of short stories.

 

I came home, as lost as always and dove right in. I didn’t get up even for dinner. I didn’t care for dinner when a little girl almost as young as me was being beaten, who shed blood like water form her body, who had no hope left in her life, no love; no one. Isolation was her only friend.

 

This was fiction. Why was I crying? I think I was moved beyond repair.

 

Since then I have read this book time and again. Every time I devour the pages of this book, I cry just the same. I don’t know about others, but this book does something different to me. You might not find this to be so poignant but I did then, and I do still.

 

Then, why do I keep picking this up, again and again?

 

This book taught me that fiction could do things to you, sometimes more than reality. This book taught me that somewhere between the pages I could lose myself. This book taught me that words are powerful. This book taught me so much more and it was with this book that I fell in love with reading and eventually writing.

 

Then, why am I doing this review now? Because I read Sea Prayer! by the same author a few days back and it ignited all those long lost memories of the book. I didn’t know even tears bring nostalgia. And because I read a sea prayer I was drawn to this book too, again. It took all my might to stay away from this one, only because I have been reading four books simultaneously and all cry for my attention. And among all those I really shouldn’t have started this one. Start, I did!

 

And I forgot the rest for a while. I don’t know how my self-control has gotten so weak but it has and honestly, I don’t regret it.

 

A Thousand Splendid Suns is dear to me, despite all its hardships and tears that the protagonist and I go through side by side. And I love the book. I love The Sea Prayer, The Kite Runner, and I liked And the Mountains Echoed too, but this is exceptional. It holds a different place. I am not saying this is my ‘favorite’ book, you must know me better than this, that I truly cannot pick one favorite book from so many. I can only say it is dear to me.

 

This being posted on the National Book Lovers Day is just another cherry for me. But then again what is this kind of celebration to someone who reads and reads only to be alive?

Sea Prayer!

A Sea prayer is published as a book but honestly it’s a poem. It is a lucid, magical poem with such colorful and breathtaking illustrations that I spent more time looking and gawking than reading.

 

The prayer seems like a bedtime story for a kid, spoken by his father on a moonlit night, but you’ll realize very soon that it just cannot be a story for that kid. It is way more intense than that. The father, a resident of Syria is not only nostalgic but makes you go through the moving scenarios and memories that run through his mind.

 

Khaled Hosseini is one word the best. I mean come on, have you read his books? In this 10 minute read you will be left with a 1000 different questions and you will have no answer whatsoever. The war, meaninglessness, the fear of unknown, love for his child, for his family, and the terror that grips the father for his child is so well portrayed in so few a words.

 

I guess that is the magic of poetry, you can say so much in so few words and your readers just don’t know what to do with them. It will take literally 10 minutes to finish this book, but I spent 30 instead, gaping at the mind-numbing illustrations, and I am still pondering over the book. It is just moving, but then again I could be biased towards Hosseini. Find out yourself if I am bias or not.

 

Also, I need to thank  for sending me this for my birthday. I had all the books from this author and now I have this copy too.

 

Why so many pictures?

 

It’s an illustrated book, so an illustrated review to tempt you into reading the entire book. 😉